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Section 3
Eyak, Inupiat, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, and Yup’ik

Question 3 | Test | Table of Contents

United States Bureau of Indian Affairs

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United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. Working Effectively with Alaska Native Tribes and Organizations. United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. August 2010. pg. 13-20.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Article References:
Gonzalez, V. M., Burroughs, A., & Skewes, M. C. (2021). Belief in the American Indian/Alaska Native biological vulnerability myth and drinking to cope: Does stereotype threat play a role? Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 27(1), 37–46.

Gonzalez, V. M., & Skewes, M. C. (2018). Association of belief in the “firewater myth” with strategies to avoid alcohol consequences among American Indian and Alaska Native college students who drink. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 32(4), 401–409.


Gundel, B. E., Bartholomew, T. T., & Scheel, M. J. (2020). Culture and care: An illustration of multicultural processes in a counseling dyad. Practice Innovations, 5(1), 19–31. 


Lardon, C., Wolsko, C., Trickett, E., Henry, D., & Hopkins, S. (2016). Assessing health in an Alaska native cultural context: The Yup’ik Wellness Survey. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 22(1), 126–136.

Norton, I. M., & Manson, S. M. (1996). Research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities: Navigating the cultural universe of values and process. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(5), 856–860.

QUESTION 3
Where do Eyak people live? To select and enter your answer go to Test
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