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Section 4
What Judges and Lawyers think about the Testimony of Mental
Health Experts: A Survey of the Courts and Bar

Question 4 | Test | Table of Contents

The National Center for Biotechnology Information

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-Villanova University School of Law, PA, USA. What judges and lawyers think about the testimony of mental health experts: a survey of the courts and bar. The National Center for Biotechnology Information, P 1.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Article References:
Baillie, P. (2015). Review of Clinicians in court: A guide to subpoenas, depositions, testifying, and everything else you need to know (2nd ed.) [Review of the book Clinicians in court: A guide to subpoenas, depositions, testifying, and everything else you need to know (2nd ed.), by A. E. Barsky]. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne, 56(2), 267–268.

Edens, J. F., Smith, S. T., Magyar, M. S., Mullen, K., Pitta, A., & Petrila, J. (2012). “Hired guns,” “charlatans,” and their “voodoo psychobabble”: Case law references to various forms of perceived bias among mental health expert witnesses. Psychological Services, 9(3), 259–271.

Williger, S. D. (1995). A trial lawyer's perspective on mental health professionals as expert witnesses. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 47(3), 141–149.

QUESTION 4
What is often important evidence considered by criminal courts in determining issues arising throughout the adjudicative process, but not all evidence provided is equally valid or probative? To select and enter your answer go to Test
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