Questions? 800.667.7745; Voice Mail: 925-391-0363
Email: [email protected]
Add To Cart

Answer Booklet
Get PRINTABLE format of this page
To print: If you do not have Adobe Reader, it's available via a free download here.

Additional post test questions for Psychologists, Ohio Counselors, and Ohio MFT’s

Answer questions below. Then click the "Check Your Score" button below. This Answer Booklet screen gives you FREE scoring and anonymous unlimited FREE trials. If you get a score of 80% or higher, and place a credit card order online, you can get an Instant Certificate for 10 CE's.
If you have problems with Scoring or placing an Order, please contact us at [email protected]


Audio Transcript Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in Track 2 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Underlined numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.

Questions:
1. What are three ways to identify how trauma can affect a client?
2. What are three ways that a client might reexperience trauma?
3. What are three types of adaptation reactions to trauma?
4. What are three manifestations of depression in conjunction with PTSD?
5. What are three ways for a client to better understand his or her emotions?
6. What are three destructive behaviors that clients use in answer to survivor guilt?
7. What are the three levels of victimization?
8. What are the three types of triggers?
9. What are three techniques that are useful in helping PTSD clients cope with their triggers?
10. What are four techniques that could help your client recall the trauma safely and accurately?
11. What are three challenges in helping clients recall their emotions during the trauma?
12. What are three aspects in addressing clients who are suffering from unresolved anger?
13. What are the three levels of grieving losses?
14. What are three exercises to help clients gain a feeling of empowerment?
Answers:
A.
Sleep disturbances; flashbacks; and emotional recall.
B. Memory prompts, revisiting the scene of the trauma, talking to others, and artistic outlets.
C. Emotional numbing, trigger avoidance, and hypervigilance.
D. Behavioral depression; learned helplessness; repressed anger; and loss and grief.
E. The trigger coping questionnaire; writing; and the abdominal breathing exercise.
F. How they articulate their anger; the targets at which they direct their anger; and forgiving their targets.
G. Analyzing the extent of the trauma; anger; and guilt.
H. Anniversary triggers, current stresses, and bodily triggers.
I. Taking Inventory, Refinding Yourself, and Accentuating the Positive. 
J. Grieving specific losses; grieving the realization of powerlessness; and grieving mortality.
K. Feeling awareness; differentiate between thoughts vs. feelings; and writing out the trauma.
L. Shattered assumptions; secondary wounding; and victim thinking.
M. Resistant clients; risks; and unresolved grief and anger.
N. Self-mutilation, substance addiction, and eating disorders.

Course Content Manual Questions The answer to Question 15 is found in Section 15 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 16 is found in Section 16 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Underlined numbers below are links to that Section. If you close your browser (i.e. Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc..) your answers will not be retained. So write them down for future work sessions.
Questions:
15. What three disorders might be confused with “complex” post-traumatic stress disorder?
16. What does Herman mean by the “dialectic of trauma”?
17. How does Yalom define an “adaptive spiral”?
18. What is the main purpose of a Trigger Chart?
19. According to Matsakis, what are two possible outcomes of a client’s near-death or “out-of-body” experience?
20. According to the author, why is survivor guilt no longer one of the formal criteria for diagnosing PTSD?
21. According to Matsakis, what are the two most likely reactions of a combat veteran to one of their triggers?
22. What does Hybels-Steer consider to be an upside of intrusions?
23. According to Schiraldi, what are the five fears that interfere with intimacy in PTSD survivors?
24. According to Porterfield, what is one way that children cope with trauma that is significantly different from adult coping mechanisms?
25. How can you gauge if a the rage-based action of a PTSD survivor’s family member is useful?
26. How do the avoidance symptoms of a parent with PTSD create a “shameful family secret”?
27. What are risk factors for trafficking Victims?
Answers:

A.  The intrusion can become an opportunity to think about the trauma in order to understand it and its mean­ing, to put it in perspective, and to resolve it by putting it into place.
B.  Group acceptance increases each member’s self-esteem, and each member in turn becomes more accepting toward others.
C.  A combat veteran may respond with anger and aggression, or he may respond with a shutdown of emotion or with attempts to remove himself physically or distance himself emotionally from the trigger.
D.  If rage-based action takes precedence over every­thing else, it is probably not helpful. If the action is balanced by attending to other aspects of the aftermath of the trauma (including taking care of him or herself), it is probably helpful.
E.  Family members accept the blame for a parent’s or partner’s PTSD symptoms, and deny that anything is wrong with the parent or the family. The trauma often becomes a shameful family secret because of this tendency to avoid and deny the real problem.
F. The two contradictory responses of intrusion and constriction in response to an experience of overwhelming danger.
G. 1. Your client may experience a spiritual revelation that brings them great peace, 2. they might experience mental, emotional, or spiritual con­fusion.
H.  Instead of experiencing denial, children often consciously and deliber­ately try to rid their minds of all thoughts of the traumatic incident and of the feelings that arise when they have these thoughts.
I.  Although prevalent and devastating among trauma survivors, survival guilt was not seen as being essential to the numbing­ reexperiencing cycle of PTSD.
J.  Loss of control, abandonment, rejection, attack, and one’s own tendency to hurt others.
K.  Somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and multiple personality disorder.
L. The main purpose of a Trigger chart is to help your client work towards change and control by understanding and anticipating when they might be triggered.
M. age, poverty, gender inequality, unemployment, sexual abuse, health/mental health problems, police/ political corruption, and high crime

If you have problems with Scoring or placing an Order, please contact us at [email protected]